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  • The Ministry of Justice and Human Rights (MINJUSDH) and the Peruvian Forensic Anthropology Team (EPAF) agree to work together.

    The Ministry of Justice and Human Rights (MINJUSDH) and the Peruvian Forensic Anthropology Team (EPAF) agree to work together. | Photo: Twitter: @MinjusDH_Peru

Published 16 May 2019

State institutions are teaming up to streamline investigations for missing persons disappeared during Peru's internal armed conflict.

Peru’s missing persons have taken center stage of a new collaborative initiative signed onto by the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights (MINJUSDH) and the Peruvian Forensic Anthropology Team (EPAF).

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The new agreement is dedicated to raising the level of efficiency in search and rescue operations involving cases from a violent chapter in Peru’s history, the internal armed conflict which transpired between 1980 and 2000.

The two federal institutions will be teaming up to create an innovative and mutual space that encourages the sharing, research, and collection of forensic data, officials say.

Both databases from the National Registry of Missing Persons and Burial Sites (RENADE) and the Genetic Data Bank will be consolidated by the pair of agencies. EPAF will crosscheck the samples taken from crime sites with those gathered from victims’ relatives and forward the results to MINJUSDH.

Vice Minister of Human Rights and Access to Justice Daniel Sanchez Velasquez and Gisela Ortiz Perea, the director of operations and legal representative of EPAF, met Wednesday to sign the agreement.

The General Directorate for the Search of Missing Persons (DGBPD), the state agency behind the majority of search and rescue operations, reports an estimated 20,329 people disappeared during the 20-year-period.


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