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  • Citizens line up to cast their votes, U.S., Oct. 15, 2020.

    Citizens line up to cast their votes, U.S., Oct. 15, 2020. | Photo: Xinhua

Published 15 October 2020
Opinion

In Wisconsin, South Dakota and Virginia, turnout has reached about 25 percent of the last presidential election's levels.

The University of Florida’s Elections Project reported that over 14 million U.S. citizens have voted so far as the Nov. 3 election day is approaching.

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The US Voting System Is Undemocratic in Many Ways

This figure, which includes absentee and in-person early voting, represents about 10 percent of the total 2016 turnout.

In Wisconsin, South Dakota, and Virginia, turnout has reached about 25 percent of the last presidential election's levels.

Georgia saw over 40 percent increase in voter turnout from 2016, with 128,590 votes cast on Monday, the first day of early voting. Texas and Kentucky also saw heavy turnout on Tuesday.

"There are three driving factors here. One is simply that states have relaxed their laws. Maybe it was through changes that were already in place or as an emergency for the pandemic. And, in the latter case, we've seen many people requesting mail ballots and voting in-person early," University of Florida professor Michael McDonald said.

"The other big factor, though, that's going on here is that there are lots of people who really are enthused to vote, and they're casting their ballots early," he added.

The 2020 presidential elections take place amidst a severe economic crisis that has increased the number of poor in the United States. 

On Thursday, Columbia University published a study holding that 8 million people have fallen below the poverty line. From May to September, the percentage of poor people increased from 14.3 to 16.7 percent.

Now the United States has 55 million people living on less than US$12,760 per year.

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