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  • Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan is welcomed by Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune at Houari Boumediene airport in Algiers, Algeria, Jan. 26, 2020.

    Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan is welcomed by Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune at Houari Boumediene airport in Algiers, Algeria, Jan. 26, 2020. | Photo: Reuters

Published 26 January 2020

In another sign that a shaky truce was faltering, Tripoli's Mitiga further to the west airport was hit by two rockets, which wounded two civilians and damaged the tarmac and buildings.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan reiterated Sunday that there won’t be a resolution to the Libyan crisis through military means during a press conference with his Algerian counterpart, Abdelmadjid Tebboune in an official visit to the North African nation. 

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Libya Summit Agree to Respect Arms Embargo, Push Ceasefire

Both leaders were part of the Germany-led peace summit, held last Sunday, in which all countries with interests in the conflict - as well as the two warring sides - agreed to respect the disregarded international arms embargo on Libya.

Among those present were Erdogan, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, Russian President Vladimir Putin, French President Emmanuel Macron, Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

Leaders from the European Union, the African Union, and the Arab League also attended. As well as envoys from the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Algeria, China and the Republic of Congo.

The rival sides agreed on a very fragile truce, as General Kalifa Haftar’s Libyan National Army (LNA) are on their last push to take the capital, Tripoli, and thus the whole control of the North African nation. 

A Fragile Truce

However, on Sunday Haftar’s forces attacked Abu Qurain area, located 140 kilometers (87 miles) south of the port city of Misrata, said Abdul-Malik Al-Madani, spokesman for the Burkan Al-Ghadab (Volcano of Rage) Operation by Libya’s U.N.-recognized government.

In another sign that a shaky truce was faltering, Tripoli's Mitiga further to the west airport was hit by two rockets, which wounded two civilians and damaged the tarmac and buildings, the U.N. mission to Libya said.

Erdogan criticized Haftar for violating the truce, as both main rival leaders U.N.-recognized Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj and Haftar agreed to a temporary ceasefire and appointed members of a military committee that will represent them at talks on a more permanent agreement.

Guterres said last week that the committee would be convened “in Geneva in the coming days,” underlining the urgency of that next step, saying all the participants committed to “put pressure on the parties for a full ceasefire to be reached.” No date has been set yet for the meeting. 

The temporary truce was proposed on Jan. 8 by Russia’s Putin and his Turkish counterpart, who back opposing sides in the Libyan conflict. 

The LNA, which is backed by Egypt, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), France and Russia, has been fighting off a nine-month-long offensive over Tripoli which is the last stronghold of al Sarraj’s Government of National Accord (GNA), which is backed by Turkey, Qatar, and Italy.

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