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  • Followers of the Houthi group demonstrate against the air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition in Sanaa.

    Followers of the Houthi group demonstrate against the air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition in Sanaa. | Photo: Reuters

Published 1 May 2015

Yemen's strategic port of Aden has been mired in fierce fighting as Saudi Arabia continues to bomb Sanaa.

Yemen's southern port of Aden saw one of its worst days of fighting in weeks Thursday, as Houthis advanced on forces loyal to ousted president Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi.

“Women and children have been burnt in their homes, civilians have been shot in the streets or blown up by tank fire,” local activist Ahmed Awgari told Reuters.

Hadi loyalists and their allies have been defending the city for weeks against a Houthi advance. Some of the fiercest fighting has been reported near the airport, where both sides have traded heavy artillery fire.

In the Houthi controlled capital Sanaa, at least 10 civilians were killed in overnight airstrikes by Saudi Arabia, according to Yemen's health ministry. The deaths add to the more than 1000 casualties caused by the Saudi-led strikes. Over 100 children are among the dead, according to the ministry's figures. The ministry claims over 3000 more have been injured.

The numbers cannot be independently verified, though human rights groups have previously warned of a growing humanitarian disaster. Unrest and Saudi airstrikes have left major cities like Sanaa with dwindling access to food and other basic supplies.

Saudi Arabia has been bombing Yemen since March 26, when the government accused the Houthi of posing a threat to the region. Saudi Arabia has backed Hadi, who was removed from power by the Houthis earlier this year. Despite the Saudis repeatedly calling for the Houthi movement to hand power back to Hadi, the Houthis remain in control of much of Yemen, including the capital, Sanaa.

RELATED: Why Saudia Arabia is Bombing Yemen

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