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  • US President Barack Obama and his Brazilian Counterpart Dilma Rousseff meet in Brasilia in an earlier meeting. (Photo: EFE)

    US President Barack Obama and his Brazilian Counterpart Dilma Rousseff meet in Brasilia in an earlier meeting. (Photo: EFE) | Photo: EFE

Published 29 October 2014

After Dilma Rousseff's re-election win on Sunday, Barack Obama called the Brazilian president congratulating her and looking to improve strained relations between the two countries.

United States President Barack Obama congratulated Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff on re-election and “reinforced his commitment to deepening our cooperation in areas such as commerce, energy, and other priority bilateral issues through our existing strategic dialogues,” on Tuesday. 

The White House released a statement saying that Obama “emphasized the strategic value of our bilateral partnership,” and that Rousseff agreed, saying that “strengthening ties with the United States is a priority for Brazil.”

Rousseff, who took office in January 2011, won a second four-year mandate in Sunday's presidential runoff, beating Senator Aecio Neves by 51.6 percent to 48.3 percent.

Edward Snowden released documents showing that the National Security Agency had intercepted Rousseff's personal communications.

NSA also targeted Brazilian government ministries and the country's state-owned oil company, Petrobras. The revelations prompted Rousseff to suspend a state visit to the United States planned for October 2013.

Rousseff also announced she will meet Obama on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Australia next month and resume reciprocal state visits in her second term.

In a televised interview Tuesday, Rousseff said last year's crisis triggered by U.S. intelligence agencies had a "suitable" solution allowing for a resumption of state visits.

"We also want to address specific issues regarding trade relations because we have been having deficits in our trade with the United States. We don't want to reverse this deficit but show that we have a huge trade potential that we want to exploit," she said.

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