• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • Turkey organizes vigil in memory of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

    Turkey organizes vigil in memory of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi. | Photo: Reuters

Published 2 October 2019

A law firm filed a petition at the International Criminal Court (ICC) against the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) who has been accused of giving the order to kill Khashoggi. 

A vigil for murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi has been organized in Istanbul, Turkey, a year after he was killed in the Saudi Arabia consulate. 

RELATED:

Saudi Crown Prince Takes Responsibility for Khashoggi Murder

Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, was murdered on October 2 at its consulate in Istanbul. His dismembered body has never been found. A global outcry ensued and led to U.S. Treasury sanctions against 17 Saudi individuals and a Senate resolution blaming Prince Mohammed.

The vigil took place near the now-closed Saudi consulate. Khashoggi’s fiancee gave a speech at the vigil. 

"I still seek justice," Hatice Cengiz said in a speech at the vigil. "I want to know what happened to his body. I want his friends to be released from jail. I want those in power are held accountable for their actions."

A law firm filed a petition at the International Criminal Court (ICC) against the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) who has been accused of giving the order to kill Khashoggi. 

The petition was filed in July and made public Wednesday and asks for an investigation into this “crime against humanity” committed by MBS. 

"Mohammed Bin Salman, through command or superior responsibility, is guilty of murder, torture, rape, extortion, illegal detentions, wrongful prosecution and the death penalty, i.e., crimes against humanity as defined in Article 7 of the Rome Statute," the filing argues.

"The victims have been selected because of their opposition to the Crown Prince’s merciless tyranny," it adds.

Agnes Callamard, a U.N. expert on summary executions, submitted a report in June which found credible evidence warranting further investigation that the Crown Prince and other senior officials, including key adviser Saud al-Qahtani, are liable for the murder.

Callamard told Reuters the only way she could interpret his admission of state responsibility -- as opposed to personal responsibility -- was as "recognizing implicitly at least that the killing was a state killing."

"To the extent the killing occurred under his watch, he represents the state, he is indeed quasi head of state," she said.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.