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  • Workers hold signs outside 14th Street Park across the Google offices after walking out as part of a global protest over workplace issues in New York, U.S., Nov. 1, 2018.

    Workers hold signs outside 14th Street Park across the Google offices after walking out as part of a global protest over workplace issues in New York, U.S., Nov. 1, 2018. | Photo: Reuters

Published 1 March 2019

After 10 years of research in 187 countries, the World Bank released a study showing that internationally, gender equality is on the rise but still lagging.

Women around the world have only three-quarters of the legal protections given to men during their working life on average, ranging from bans on entering some jobs to a lack of equal pay or freedom from sexual harassment, the World Bank said Wednesday.

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Researchers examined whether adult men and women had equal rights under laws in 187 countries to produce an equality index and measure progress over the last decade. 

They probed laws linked to women’s work and economic freedom, including the right to work in all the same jobs as men and get paid equally, penalties for sexual harassment at work, parental work protections, and inheritance rights.

“If women have equal opportunities to reach their full potential, the world would not only be fairer, it would be more prosperous as well,” World Bank Group’s interim president Kristalina Georgieva said.

Discriminatory laws mean women are held back from gaining economic independence and also contribute to a loss of US$160 trillion in lost earnings worldwide each year, the World Bank said in a 2018 report.

The new study also looked at women’s freedom of movement, and protection from domestic abuse as these aspects of women’s lives impact their economic independence. Steady progress was seen over the last decade in a total of 131 countries which had enacted reforms to women’s rights.

However, 56 countries made no improvements to equality laws at all in the areas studied over the last 10 years. Six European countries - Belgium, Denmark, France, Latvia, Luxembourg, and Sweden – currently have perfect scores of 100 in the index. Ten years ago, no country has such a high score.

Europe and Central Asia had the highest regional equality score, with women getting about 85 percent of the rights granted to men on average, while in the Middle East and North Africa women had fewer than half the rights of men.

“We definitely are making progress but we can’t rest on our laurels - we have got to keep governments moving in the right direction,” Jacqui Hunt, Europe director of global women’s rights group Equality Now told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

She added that a perfect score was no guarantee that rights would always be respected and urged governments to proactively work to fight gender discrimination.

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