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  • A general view of Iran’s Bushehr nuclear power plant, built by Russia, October 26, 2010.

    A general view of Iran’s Bushehr nuclear power plant, built by Russia, October 26, 2010. | Photo: Reuters

Published 23 July 2019
Opinion

The 2015 nuclear pact hangs on by a thread as tensions continue to grow between the U.S. and Iran mainly caused by Trump’s decision to pull out of the accord.

The international governments that are still signatories to the 2015 Iran nuclear deal will meet on July 28 in Vienna to discuss to what extent the agreement can be saved, according to the European Union's diplomatic service.

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China, France, Germany, Russia, United Kingdom, Iran and EU representatives will "examine issues linked to the implementation of the Joint Commission of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) in all its aspects," the EU statement said on Tuesday.

This comes as Senior Iranian officials warned Tehran would boost its uranium enrichment, beyond the permitted 3.67 percent, every 60 days unless European powers protect them from United States sanctions.

Although Iran said is willing to hold negotiation talks with the United States if Donald Trump’s administration lifts sanctions and returns to the nuclear deal it quit last year, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said in a televised speech on July 14.

“We have always believed in talks ... if they lift sanctions, end the imposed economic pressure and return to the deal, we are ready to hold talks, right now and anywhere,” the Iranian head of state stated, adding that the condition is for Iran to first be able to export as much oil as it did prior to May 2018.

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As the 2015 nuclear pact hangs on by a thread tensions continue to grow between the U.S. and Iran mainly caused by Trump’s decision to pull out of the nuclear deal and subsequently reimposed tough sanctions on Iran’s oil industry to strangle the country’s economy.

Measures worsen, on April 22, as Trump decided to eliminate all waivers issued to eight economies allowing them to buy Iranian oil, basically imposing third-party sanctions. 

“We believe that the time has come to act responsibly and to look for ways to stop the escalation of tension and resume dialogue,” the French, German and British governments said in a joint statement last week. 

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