• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
News > World

'In The Bull's-Eye:' North Carolina Orders Evacuations as Storm Nears

  • A photo taken from the International Space Station shows Hurricane Florence over the Atlantic Ocean in the early morning of Sept. 6, 2018.

    A photo taken from the International Space Station shows Hurricane Florence over the Atlantic Ocean in the early morning of Sept. 6, 2018. | Photo: Reuters

Published 10 September 2018
Opinion

Governor Cooper declared a state of emergency in North Carolina, as did his counterparts in neighboring South Carolina and Virginia.

North Carolina residents boarded up their homes and piled cars with valuables on Monday after officials warned coastal areas would be hit by Hurricane Florence, the most powerful storm to take aim at the U.S. mainland this year.

RELATED:
Puerto Rico: Study Puts Hurricane Maria Death Toll at 2,975

The storm had winds of 130 miles per hour (209 kph) and was due to gain strength before it made landfall, which the U.S. National Hurricane Center said was likely to occur early Thursday, bringing heavy rain that could cause severe flooding through the region.

"We are in the bull's-eye," North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper told a news conference Monday. Officials ordered residents and visitors to begin evacuating the Outer Banks. "This is going to be a statewide event."

The United States faced a series of high-powered hurricanes last year, including Hurricane Maria, which killed some 3,000 people in Puerto Rico, and Hurricane Harvey, which killed about 68 people and caused an estimated US$1.25 billion in damage when it brought catastrophic flooding to Houston.

By 11 a.m. ET on Monday, Florence was about 1,240 miles (2,000 km) east-southwest of Cape Fear, North Carolina, and was a Category 4, the second-strongest on the Saffir-Simpson scale, the NHC said.

U.S. President Donald Trump, whose administration faced severe criticism for abandoning Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, canceled a political rally planned for Friday in Jackson, Mississippi, over safety concerns related to Florence, his campaign said.

Cooper declared a state of emergency in North Carolina, as did his counterparts in neighboring South Carolina and Virginia. He said he had asked Trump to declare a federal state of emergency for North Carolina.

Florence could bring a life-threatening coastal storm surge, and inland flooding as far north as Virginia, the NHC said.

Historically, 90 percent of fatalities from hurricanes, tropical storms and tropical depressions have been caused by water, said NHC spokesman Dennis Feltgen said. Some 27 percent of the deaths have come from rain-driven flooding, sometimes hundreds of miles inland.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.