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  • Protesters hold up five fingers and a U.S. flag during a rally to the U.S. Consulate General in Hong Kong, China September 8, 2019.

    Protesters hold up five fingers and a U.S. flag during a rally to the U.S. Consulate General in Hong Kong, China September 8, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 8 September 2019

Following the steps of other “opposition” voices in countries like Venezuela, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Ukraine, the western-backed Hongkongers demand U.S. intervention through unilateral measures.

Hong Kong’s anti-government protestors proudly showed their true colors on Sunday, as they marched with the blue, red and white flag of the United States asking for U.S. President Donald Trump to “liberate” the city. 

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Hong Kong Strongly Condemns Vandalistic Acts of Protesters

"The U.S. will not 'free' Hong Kong, but will only destabilize China, including Hong Kong, to hit hard their perceived competitor," Vice-chairman of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong Chan Yung told Global Times.

Heading towards the U.S. Consulate the government-sanctioned demonstration gathered hundreds of protesters waving U.S. flags as they sang the U.S. national anthem played through the speakers on their phones. 

The objective was to call for politicians in the North American nation to support their cause and meddle in internal affairs, despite this being a violation of national sovereignty and international law. 

An associate professor at Beihang University in Beijing and an expert on Hong Kong studies, Tian Feilong, believes the appeal by Hong Kong protesters is evidence that they collude with external forces to jeopardize Hong Kong's international status and fundamental interests.

Following the steps of other “opposition” voices in countries like Venezuela, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Ukraine, the western-backed Hongkongers demand U.S. intervention through unilateral measures that target national interests, in this case, the passing of the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act.

Protesters march to call for the passing of the proposed Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act by the U.S. Congress. Photo: Reuters

The proposed legislation is an amendment to the Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992. Firstly introduced in 2016 by Republican Senator Marco Rubio and Democratic Senator Ben Cardin, the bill is now experiencing bipartisan support in Congress as it was reintroduced in June by members of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China.

If passed it would require an annual review of the 1992 special treatment, include the trade and business privileges Hong Kong enjoys separate from China, and allow asset freezes and denial of entry into the U.S. for Chinese officials.

Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Geng Shuang said on Friday that China “deplores and firmly opposes” U.S. senators' attempted move to push the law as interfering in China's internal affairs.

Although a clear interference in China's domestic affairs, which in turn violates international law and international relations principles, professor Tian agrees that it is very likely that the U.S. Congress will pass the bill. 

"After the trade issue, the next card the U.S. will play is the Hong Kong and Taiwan affairs," he added.

As of Saturday, Hong Kong’s government has strongly condemned the vandalistic acts of radical western-backed protesters, as more actions to affect the city’s infrastructure and normalization of activities continue despite attempts by the government to appease the current situation.

On Sept. 4 Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam laid out her plans to end the western-backed protests, including the formal withdrawal of the controversial extradition bill, which sparked the protests 14-weeks ago.

The move has been celebrated in Chinese public media as a sign of conciliation and peace, the Global Times stated. Although, extremist sections within the protest movement have rejected the measures.

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