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  • Honduran doctors and teachers continue their demonstrations against the installed right-wing government.

    Honduran doctors and teachers continue their demonstrations against the installed right-wing government. | Photo: Reuters

Published 4 July 2019

On Thursday, police cracked down on a student-teacher sit-in with teargas, as reported by teleSUR's correspondent.

Teachers and students are renewing round of protests across the country in favor of public healthcare and education services on Thursday and Friday amid police violence and repression, reported local media.

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The Platform for the Defense of Health and Education, which convoked the demonstrations, said the government had intensified the repression and harassment against the teachers who went back to work, especially the ones involved in the struggle for better education.

Students and teachers organized a sit-in in the Technical Institute of El Carrizal de Comayagüela since 7:00 am, local time, and in the Central Institute Vicente Cacere the following day. 

However, the police cracked down on the sit-in with teargas, as reported by teleSUR's correspondent.

On Tuesday, the Interamerican Commission of Human Rights urged the government to guarantee the right to protest and peacefully gathering, expressing concern over the police violence deployed in recent weeks, especially on June 17 and 20, when reportedly three people died and 18 were injured in clashes with the police.

The following week, the National Autonomous University of Honduras was invaded by military police amidst massive protests against right-wing President Juan Orlando Hernandez (JOH).

This endless wave of protests began to unfold on April 26 when the National Congress passed the "Law for Restructuring and Transforming the Health and Education Sectors," a reform backed by the right-wing president which seeks the privatization of health and education facilities.

Although such law was repealed on June 2, Hondurans did not stop demonstrating and demanding the resignation of the president. JOH is the last link in a series of U.S.-backed leaders who took office since the military coup that overthrew President Manuel Zelaya on June 28, 2009.

The left-wing leader, who was trying to introduce land reforms and calling for a constituent assembly, was kidnapped by soldiers who flew him to Costa Rica. The Honduran military-installed then the National Assembly President Roberto Micheletti as interim president.

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