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  • Abortion rights activists protest outside a U.S. federal court in Austin, Texas August 4, 2014. (Photo: Reuters)

    Abortion rights activists protest outside a U.S. federal court in Austin, Texas August 4, 2014. (Photo: Reuters) | Photo: Reuters

Published 29 August 2014

The law was due to come into effect on Monday. 

A Texas judge on Friday struck down parts of a recently approved abortion law seen as restrictive by activists and several NGOS.

The judge's decision specifically overturned a provision that forced all abortion clinics in the state to have certain hospital-like equipment and facilities in order to carry out surgeries.

U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel said in his decision that the Texas law, due to take effect Monday, was unconstitutional as it imposes an undue burden on the right of women to seek a pre-viability abortion.

Abortion rights advocates said such measures were unnecessary, especially when an abortion is medically induced.

Advocacy groups who brought the suit had argued the requirement was costly and had no medical benefit, seeing it as mostly intended to shut clinics that could not afford to make the changes.

The state argued the measure was intended to protect women lives and that the requirement reduces complications and increases patient care when complications occur.

The State of Texas warned that it will appeal the decision. “The state disagrees with the court’s ruling and will seek immediate relief from the 5th Circuit,” said Lauren Bean, a spokeswoman for Attorney General Greg Abbott.

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