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  • Jean Henry Ceant (R), two-time presidential candidate and leader of the Renmen Ayiti (Love Haiti) political party.

    Jean Henry Ceant (R), two-time presidential candidate and leader of the Renmen Ayiti (Love Haiti) political party. | Photo: Twitter: @jeanhenryceant

Published 16 August 2018

A presidential candidate in both the 2010 and 2016 elections, Jean Henry Ceant is a notary by trade and advocates for improvements to Haitian society.

Six days have passed since Haiti's prime ministerial nominee Jean Henry Ceant delivered his documents to parliament, but not a word has been heard from the country's ministers about his appointment.

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Haiti's President Moise Calls for Peace After PM Resigns

The 62-year-old two-time presidential candidate and leader of the Renmen Ayiti (Love Haiti) political party was tapped as the country's next prime minister by President Jovenel Moise on August 5.

The president released the news on Twitter after the former prime minister, Jack Guy Lafontant, announced his sudden resignation due to violent conflicts triggered by a controversial agreement with the International Monetary Fund to raise fuel prices.

"After consultations with the presidents of the two branches of parliament, I made the choice of citizen @jeanhenryceant as new prime minister," Moise wrote, just 72 hours before submitting his request to parliament.

Days later, Ceant made his own announcement on Twitter, saying: "I proceeded to deposit my documents in the Senate of the Republic and the Chamber of Deputies. This, in accordance with the wishes of the Constitution."

A presidential candidate in both the 2010 and 2016 elections, Ceant, a notary by trade, advocates for improvements to Haitian society.

"I wish all my brothers and sisters a day of peace in prayer, love and union to build together a better tomorrow for our common homeland," Ceant tweeted.

According to Haiti Libre, the Senate and Chamber of Commerce have yet to begin their analysis, but the change in parliament could be the key to stabilizing the nation.

In July, as part of an agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Haitian government announced a reduction in fuel subsidies that would have caused a 38 percent rise in gasoline prices and 47 percent hike for diesel.

The move triggered widespread protests during which demonstrators barricaded roads, looted stores, and set cars ablaze in the capital, Port-au-Prince. At least seven were killed in the violent demonstrations.

The former prime minister announced his resignation July 14 as he was facing a vote of no confidence in an interpellation session in the Chamber of Deputies.

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