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  •  A combination photo shows the lunar eclipse from a blood moon (top L) back to full moon (bottom right) in the sky over Frankfurt, Germany, July 27, 2018.

    A combination photo shows the lunar eclipse from a blood moon (top L) back to full moon (bottom right) in the sky over Frankfurt, Germany, July 27, 2018. | Photo: Reuters

Published 19 January 2019
Opinion

On Sunday, people in the Americas will be able to watch a "Super Blood Wolf Moon."

A "Super Blood Wolf Moon" will on Sunday be visible in the Americas, Western Europe and Africa - the last until May 2021.

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This total lunar eclipse will be observable from America, Europe and Africa, but the best viewing - if skies are clear - willl be from North and South America.

The celestial spectacle, that will last for about an hour, will merge three different astronomical phenomena: a total lunar eclipse, a "blood moon" and a "super moon."

A "super" moon occurs when the moon is especially close to Earth, while a "wolf moon" is the traditional name for the full moon of January.

In a total lunar eclipse, the moon never goes completely dark. Rather, it takes on a reddish glow from refracted light as the heavenly bodies move into position - hence the "blood moon" moniker. The more particulate or pollution in the atmosphere, the redder the moon appears.

The phenomenon can be seen with the naked eye and no protection is needed to safely enjoy the view, Griffith Observatory said. While total lunar eclipses are not especially rare, the 2019 version takes place early enough in the evening that it can be enjoyed by the western hemisphere.

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