• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • Campaigners held a demonstration outside the court where they laid flowers and placed photographs of the victims, Guatemala City, Guatemala, October 13, 2017.

    Campaigners held a demonstration outside the court where they laid flowers and placed photographs of the victims, Guatemala City, Guatemala, October 13, 2017. | Photo: EFE

Published 13 October 2017
Opinion

91-year-old Rios Montt did not attend because he is being treated for senile dementia.

The genocide retrial of the former Guatemalan dicatator, Efrain Rios Montt, has started at a High Risk Court in the capital Guatemala City.

RELATED:

Second Genocide Trial of Guatemala's Former Dictator Rios Montt

It is being conducted behind closed doors at the request of the Tribunal.

91-year-old Rios Montt did not attend as he is being treated for senile dementia.

Two lawyers are representing him but they were expelled from the court.

According to the Center for Legal Action for Human Rights, CALDH, Luis Rosales and Jaime Hernandez were told to leave because they presented a complaint for several crimes to the Public Ministry.

After they had left, the trial continued with the reading of evidence.

Campaigners for CALDH held a demonstration outside the court where they laid flowers and placed photographs of the victims.

Rios Montt is accused of ordering the massacre of 1,771 Ixil Maya people in the northwestern department of Quiche during his rule from 1982 to 1983.

He had already been sentenced to 80 years in prison in May 2013, but the sentence was overturned and the Constitutional Court ordered a retrial.

His daughter Zury Rios Sosa told a radio program on Thursday that it is "a revenge" trial and his human rights are being violated because "he does not have his mental faculties to defend himself."

Rios Montt has said "there was no genocide" - the victims died in an armed confrontation.

But CALDH's representative, Francisco Soto, maintains that the process is a matter of "justice" for the Ixils who were killed by the military.

If found guilty, Rios Montt cannot be sentenced because he was diagnosed with dementia in 2015.

Guatemala's former intelligence chief Jose Rodriguez is also on trial accused of genocide.

The country's 1960-1996 civil war led to the deaths of more than 200,000 people and was the bloodiest among the conflicts seen in Latin America during the era.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.