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  • Former Bolivian President Evo Morales arrives to a news conference after having a meeting with members of the Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) party to fix date and place where the Bolivian presidential candidate for the MAS party will be chosen, in Buenos Aires, Argentina December 29, 2019.

    Former Bolivian President Evo Morales arrives to a news conference after having a meeting with members of the Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) party to fix date and place where the Bolivian presidential candidate for the MAS party will be chosen, in Buenos Aires, Argentina December 29, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 31 December 2019

Morales pointed out that the regime of the self-proclaimed president, Jeanine Áñez, has been dentrimental to Bolivia as they have expelled the Mexican ambassador and Spanish diplomats, while also breaking of relations with Venezuela.

The expulsion of diplomats from Mexico and Spain by the de facto Bolivian regime is an act of contempt for international law, the democratically elected President Evo Morales said on Tuesday. Morales condemned the move by "the coup plotters," highlighting the fact that they have been hurting the Andean nation's diplomatic ties.

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"The coup plotters seek legitimacy, but only exert violence against sister countries," Morales tweeted on his Twitter account.

Morales pointed out that the regime of the self-proclaimed president, Jeanine Áñez, has been dentrimental to Bolivia as they have expelled the Mexican ambassador and Spanish diplomats, while also breaking of relations with Venezuela.

In her statement this week, Áñez justified the expulsion of the Mexican ambassador and Spanish diplomats because they "seriously" harmed the sovereignty and dignity of the Bolivian people with activities that violate the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

This decision was made from an incident that occurred on Friday at the residence of the Mexican ambassador, where nine government officials have sought asylum, and in which at least six officials from the Spanish embassy were involved.

According to Spain's El-Pais, the Bolivian regime expelled the Mexican ambasador, María Teresa Mercado, the charge of business of Spain in Bolivia, Cristina Borreguero, and the councilor of Spain to Bolivia, Álvaro Fernández. They were given 72 hours to leave the country.

In a tit-for-tat move, the Spanish government expelled three Bolivian diplomats from their country. In a gesture to alleviate the tension, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the de facto Government of Bolivia, Karen Longaric, has affirmed that relations with Spain "cannot stop" and has even called for "strengthening them".

"Bilateral relations with Spain cannot stop, they have to follow their course and we have to meet again and strengthen relations," Longaric said.
 

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