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  • Police officers investigate a suspected arson at a mosque in the southern Swedish town of Eslov December 29, 2014.

    Police officers investigate a suspected arson at a mosque in the southern Swedish town of Eslov December 29, 2014. | Photo: Reuters

Published 29 December 2014

The latest attack comes on the back of growing support for the far-right and anti-immigrant parties.

A fire broke out in a mosque in the Swedish town of Eslov early Monday morning, the second attack on a Swedish mosque in the past week. A Swedish police officer said to TT News agency about the recent attack, “We ... are working under the assumption it is arson.”

Authorities say that it was most likely caused by a flammable liquid. A couple of months ago, the same mosque had been vandalized with anti-immigrant rhetoric.

The imam of the Islamic Cultural Association said after the recent attack that he is “scared and worried.”

Fire department spokesperson, Gustaf Sandell said, “There is no possible natural explanation for this type of fire to break out by itself.”

On Christmas, December 25, there was an arson attack on a mosque in Eskilstuna, Sweden, which wounded five people. Sweden's prime minister Stefan Lofven said that the Christmas assault was “hateful violence.”

An anti-immigrant political party, the Sweden Democrats, has been intensifying its campaign against refugees and migrants, blaming them for unemployment in Sweden. It wants to drastically reduce the number of asylum seekers entering Sweden by 90 percent and has its roots in neo-Nazi movements. In September, the party won 12.9 percent of the votes, making it the third-largest party in the Swedish parliament.

There are around 475,000 people belonging to Muslim communities living in Sweden, according to the U.S. Department of State.

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