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  • The Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities said that it will reveal further details of the finding in the coming days.

    The Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities said that it will reveal further details of the finding in the coming days. | Photo: EPA/

Published 21 September 2020
Opinion

The Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities confirmed in a statement that "initial studies indicate that these coffins are completely closed and haven't been opened since they were buried."

Archaeologist unhearted 27 sarcophagi that had been buried for more than 2.500 years in the necropolis of Saqqara, Egypt's Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities announced on Monday.

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The authorities reported that 13 coffins were discovered earlier this month in an 11-meter deep well, and 14 more were found last week in another well. However, specialists still have to determine the origins of the coffins, and more excavations are underway.

The sarcophagi have colorful decorations with Egyptian hieroglyphics on it as well as other artifacts. The Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities confirmed in a statement that "initial studies indicate that these coffins are completely closed and haven't been opened since they were buried."

Saqqara was declared by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as a World Heritage site in the 1970s. The place was the burial ground of ancient Egypt capital Memphis. One of its latest discoveries occurred in 2018  when archaeologists found a cache with hundreds of mummified animals. The pieces were exhibited for the first last year.

Egypt is relying on its tourism industry to recover the economy amid the COVID-19 pandemic. On July 1, the authorities opened famous archaeological sites such as Giza's pyramids. The Djoser's Step pyramid at Saqqara had resumed visits in March after a 14-years restoration.

On the other hand, the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities said that it would reveal further details of the finding in the coming days. Some experts already have branded the discoveries as "one of the largest of its kind."

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