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  • Troy Goode was “hog-tied,” his face down with a strap over the back of his head so he couldn’t move his head. He later died in hospital.

    Troy Goode was “hog-tied,” his face down with a strap over the back of his head so he couldn’t move his head. He later died in hospital. | Photo: Youtube / snirkyd

Published 22 July 2015

The recent death in police custody comes few weeks after an unarmed Black man was strangled to death in the same state.

The family of Troy Goode, a Mississippi man who died over the weekend during arrest after the police hogtied him during arrest at a concert, were asking for state and federal help in the case, Tim Edwards, the lawyer representing the Goode family, said Tuesday.

Goode's death further highlights increasing police brutality in the U.S. state as his death comes only weeks after Jonathan Sanders, a horse trainer and a Black man from a small town in Mississippi, died when a policeman choked him to death after he was arrested while walking his horse.

RELATED: Resistance to Police Brutality and Racism in the US

Goode, who has asthma, had taken the psychotropic drug LSD and was acting erratically, prompting witnesses to call the police because they believed he was fighting with his wife, Kelli Goode, according to Edwards and a statement by Southaven police.

The police statement did not say that Goode, a chemical engineer, was hog-tied, but a video taken by witnesses showed that he was. Goode was complaining that he could not breathe.

"His face was buried in the mattress of the stretcher," Edwards told NBC News on Monday. "There was a strap over the back of his head so he couldn't move his head. His hands and feet were hogtied so he couldn't move those, either."

His wife was not allowed to go to the hospital with him, Edwards said. He was taken to Baptist Memorial Hospital-Desoto.

District Attorney John Champion said Tuesday that preliminary results of Goode’s autopsy suggested he died from a heart-related issue. He also said police were within their right to use restraining technique, which he refused to call hog-tying.

“I’m not using that term. Okay, I refuse to use that term, because that’s not what this is,” Champion said as cited by the local WREG TV station. 

RELATED: Is the Anti-Police Violence Movement a New Chapter in the Black Freedom Struggle?

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