• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • A man reads a newspaper as his friend looks at his mobile phone, as they sit next to collapsed houses on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, May 15, 2015.

    A man reads a newspaper as his friend looks at his mobile phone, as they sit next to collapsed houses on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, May 15, 2015. | Photo: Reuters

Published 15 May 2015

Continuous strong tremors are forcing authorities to focus on immediate safety rather than a return to everyday life.

Nepalese are losing hope of a speedy recovery, after a second major earthquake hit the country Tuesday, after the first on April 25. Aftershocks continue to defy predictions, with strong tremors continuing to hit the country.

The continuous tremors are seeing officials focus on immediate safety, rather than on helping citizens return to normal life. Over Thursday night, teleSUR’s correspondent in Nepal, Sewa Bhattarai, observed public spaces filling up with tents. In Tundikhel, the open space with the highest number of tents, makeshift camps sprang up beside the tents in place after April 25.

“The aftershock on May 12 destroyed homes, which had been weakened by the first one on April 25, including mine, I have been here since May 12,” Sunita Lama, a resident of Kathmandu, told teleSUR. Another resident, Pawan Panthi, said she was living in the square, because she found open spaces safer than living in a house.

​Business are still closed, and daily activities such as schooling have been suspended.

“We had opened our hall on May 10. But after the quake on May 12, the hall is closed until further notice,” said Binod Paudel, the manager of the QFX Kumari theatre.

Many hospitals continue to operate from tents, thousands of public buildings are damaged, and many ministries including the prime minister's office are operating from tents.

“The court is not able to provide hearings at the moment. Limited services are provided from tents and alternative facilities,” a Baburam Dahal, a Supreme Court told teleSUR.

As life becomes more and more difficult, 100,000 people have left the capital, Kathmandu, since May 12, on top of the 800,000 who left in the previous two weeks.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.