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  • Children held by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), after crossing the border between Mexico and the United States to request asylum, in El Paso, Texas, U.S., March 29, 2019.

    Children held by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), after crossing the border between Mexico and the United States to request asylum, in El Paso, Texas, U.S., March 29, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 13 December 2019

The crisis in the border with Mexico reached its highest level last May, with 132,887 detentions, the highest number of arrests in just one month since 2006.

The number of immigrants deported included 5,700 families, an increase of 110 percent over the previous fiscal year in the fiscal year 2019 - between Oct. 1, 2018 and Sept. 30, 2019 - compared to the same period in 2018, reported Wednesday the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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Deportations of undocumented immigrants who entered the United States rose by 4.3 percent globally in 2019, as 267,258 people were deported, compared to 256,085 in 2018.

During the fiscal year 2017, when Trump assumed the presidency in January, 226,119 people were deported, a statistic that includes the last months of the Obama administration.

However, the figures registered during President Donald Trump’s administration don’t exceed those recorded by his predecessor, Barack Obama, between 2009 and 2017.

Deportations from the previous administration totaled 389,834 cases in 2009 and increased to 409,849 in 2012, closing with 240,255 deportees in 2016.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency also announced the number of immigrants detained on the border with Mexico, which reached 33,510 cases last November.

Among such cases, 21,189 were adults by themselves, 9,000 were families (defined by the authorities as individuals with a minor, a parent or legal guardian), and 3,321 were unaccompanied minors.

In November, 9,139 immigrants were denied entry across the border.

ICE also reported that although the number of detainees or those not admitted to the country grew by 68 percent in the last fiscal year, overall arrests by ICE fell by 10 percent compared to 2018 and only by 12 percent for convicted criminals.

The detainees included more than 1,900 people convicted and charged with homicide, another 1,800 convicted or accused of kidnapping, some 12,000 linked to sexual crimes, about 45,000 related to assaults, 67,000 convicted or drug offenses and about 1,000 for firearms, among others, according to ICE.

With the arrival of massive numbers of immigrants, especially from the countries of the so-called “Northern Triangle” of Central America (El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras), the average length of the detained population in ICE facilities was 34.3 days.

This average showed a decrease compared to the average of 39.4 days in the fiscal year 2018 and 43.7 days in 2017.

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