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  • Image of Jair Bolsonaro against the background of mass graves in Brazil, 2020.

    Image of Jair Bolsonaro against the background of mass graves in Brazil, 2020. | Photo: Twitter/ @ptbrasil

Published 3 June 2020
Opinion

This country reached 18 consecutive days without having a regular health minister.

When asked for a word for the relatives of the COVID-19 victims, Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro replied that death "is everyone's destiny" on Tuesday, a day in which his country recorded new records of infections and deaths.

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"I regret all the dead but it is everyone's destiny," Bolsonaro told a supporter who, after mentioning passages from the Bible, asked him for a message for the mourners.

On June 2, the Health Ministry recognized 28,936 new COVID-19 cases and 1,262 new deaths in a single day. The death toll increased to 31,199 and the number of infected rose to 555,383, which places Brazil as the world's second country with the highest number of cases.

While this is happening, Brazil reached 18 days without a regular health minister since the last two doctors who ran that institution resigned as a result of their discrepancies with Bolsonaro, who named a paratrooper general as provisional manager of the Health Ministry.​​​​​​​

The far-right president considers that more than half of the Brazilian population will contract the disease regardless of the preventive measures that could be adopted. Therefore, as he has always said, his priority is to keep the Brazilian economy working.

From 'fantasy' to 30,000 dead: remember what Jair Bolsonaro said during the pandemic. In March, the president denied the "destructive power" of the virus. Today, 30,000 deaths are "everyone's destiny."

In this context, his little concern for the death toll has become proverbial. On April 20, when asked about the increasing number of deaths, Bolsonaro said that he did not work as a gravedigger for someone to ask him about the deceased.

A week later, facing a similar question, he said that he could do nothing. "Sorry, but what do you want me to do?" the former captain stated.​​​​​​​

Regarding this way of conceiving public issues, local outlets recalled what Bolsonaro said in 1999 when he wanted to eliminate those who did not share his vision of the world.

"Through the vote, you cannot change anything in this country, absolutely nothing! Unfortunately, it will only change if one day we have a civil war here and doing the work the dictatorship did not do: kill some 30,000 people... Some innocent people will die, but innocent people die in a war.”

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