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  • Demonstrators holding Chilean, Argentinian and Colombian flags take part in a protest as a national strike continues in Bogota, Colombia, Dec. 4, 2019.

    Demonstrators holding Chilean, Argentinian and Colombian flags take part in a protest as a national strike continues in Bogota, Colombia, Dec. 4, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 7 December 2019

Among other things, Colombians are protesting against reforms seeking to set minimum wages according to each geographical region's productivity.

Colombia's National Paro Committee has called for a new protest on Saturday, which includes a vigil at night. For two weeks, Colombians have been protesting in rejection of President Ivan Duque's policies and in defense of the peace process.

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Concentrations enlivened by cultural performances, dances, pot-banging and even a "cycle path of resistance" are some of the initiatives that have taken place throughout the country.

In cities such as Cali, Medellin, Cartagena, Barranquilla, and Bogota, demonstrations have been massive and have lasted even during the night.

"No more children, indigenous and former guerrillas killed," and "Protesting is a right, repressing those who protest is a crime," are some phrases that appear on the posters raised by the dissatisfied citizens, who have also denounced police brutality.

"The government must listen to the people and work according to the needs of the people," a protester told Prensa Latina.

Other citizens agreed that the massive protests that occur in Colombia happen because people want to have a good government.

Today marks the 90th anniversary of the first strike of female workers in Colombia. In Bello, in the Antioquia department, 90 years ago, one of the most significant strikes in the Colombian trade union history took place.

​​​​​Since Nov. 21, Colombians have made three major national strikes, which has been described as a historical fact that demonstrates the magnitude of social rejection of the Duke administration.

This week, thousands of people continued to protest in favor of deep reforms in areas such as education, health, environment, and security.

Among other things, Colombians are protesting against reforms seeking to define the minimum wage according to each geographical region's productivity, which would imply a serious loss of income for rural workers and families.

Duque also seeks to impose ​​​​​​​hiring workers for hours and reduce minimum wages for under-25-yo workers by 25 percent.

Regarding senior citizens, the neoliberal policy package seeks to facilitate the conversion of the national public pension system into a private fund.

On the other hand, when it comes to big business and multinational companies, Duque maintains another attitude: his reforms foster tax reductions for them.​​​​​​​

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