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  • U.S. President Donald Trump (L) with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping.

    U.S. President Donald Trump (L) with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. | Photo: Reuters

Published 24 April 2018

Among the problems raised by the report is the United States' habit of violating human rights in other countries.
 

China released a report titled “Human Rights Record of the United States in 2017,” in response to the human rights report on China released by the U.S. State Department on April 20.

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The report points out that the United States continuously poses as “the guardian of human rights” and a “human rights judge,” while maintaining a dismal human rights record of its own.

Among the problems raised by the report are the United States' habit of violating human rights in other countries, systematic racial discrimination, flaws in democracy, and a widening wealth gap.

The report criticizes U.S. military operations for resulting in heavy civilian casualties, and says that the U.S. military has in recent years bombed at least 12 schools, 15 mosques, 15 bridges, as well as residential neighborhoods, hospitals, cultural relics and a refugee camp.

While the United States continues to stir up fears about alleged Russian and Chinese influence abroad, the report points out that the United States has a long history of waging cyber warfare.

The report quoted American academics who said that confidence in U.S. democracy is at an all-time low.

The report said that homelessness and poverty are increasing in the United States, even though the wealthiest income groups continue to grow wealthier, citing statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau indicating that over 40 million Americans live in poverty, with 18.5 million in extreme poverty.

It attacked the pervasiveness of racism in the United States, pointing out that decades after the granting of basic civil rights, discrimination based on race continues to exist among law enforcement and judicial bodies, with black men receiving sentences an average of 19.1 percent longer than white men, citing a report from the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

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