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  • About 200 Hongkongers criticized the Hong Kong Journalists Association for their double-standards in regards to press neutrality.

    About 200 Hongkongers criticized the Hong Kong Journalists Association for their double-standards in regards to press neutrality. | Photo: Global Times

Published 14 August 2019

About 200 Hongkongers criticized the Hong Kong Journalists Association for their double-standards in treating mainland reporters

The All-China Journalists Association (ACJA) voiced strong indignation Wednesday and condemned the violent detaining and torturing of a journalist working for the Global Times by protesters at the Hong Kong International Airport Tuesday night.

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“The radicals' brutal battery and forcible holding of the journalist is a serious personal assault and deplorable violent crime, a disregard and violation of the legitimate rights and interests of journalists, a challenge and insult to the press circle across the world and a serious trampling on freedom of the press,” the statement reads.

The ACJA also expressed full support for the reporter, Fu Guohao, respecting his determination to back Hong Kong police even when facing imminent danger.

Meanwhile, on Wednesday afternoon, about 200 Hongkongers criticized the Hong Kong Journalists Association for their double-standards in treating mainland reporters, which according to some undermines the neutrality of press and leaves a negative impact.

Opposition protesters in Hong Kong Tuesday occupied the city’s international airport on Tuesday as they waved waving United States flags and played its national anthem. As protesters rioted inside the airport, events turned violent and Fu was sequestered by the violent demonstrators. 

The reporter was tied with his hands behind his head, was beaten and had lasers pointed directly at his eyes, before being carried out on a stretcher. The lasers have been prominent at the protests as a means of evading detection from security cameras, though protesters have also used it against police officers, causing injuries. 

Hong Kong airport authorities said they have obtained an interim injunction from the court, prohibiting anyone from deliberately or intentionally obstructing or interfering with the normal use of the airport after the violent events.

Protesters are angered at local authorities who they believe to be too close to Beijing. Despite being part of China since 1997, the area has a degree of autonomy from the mainland, and many do not identify with Beijing, with many waving flags of the colonial rule (1842-1997) under the United Kingdom or the U.S., rather than the red flag of Hong Kong.

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