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  • A human rights activist with images of missing people on her, together with congress members present a constitutional accusation against the decision of the Supreme Court to grant parole to human right abusers during Chilean dictatorship, in Valparaiso, Chile August 22, 2018

    A human rights activist with images of missing people on her, together with congress members present a constitutional accusation against the decision of the Supreme Court to grant parole to human right abusers during Chilean dictatorship, in Valparaiso, Chile August 22, 2018 | Photo: Reuters

Published 23 August 2018

Former Colonel Sergio Arredondo, convicted of killing at least 14 people in 1973, has died at Santiago's Military Hospital.

A convicted Chilean army death squad member died at age 92 in the Santiago.

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Chile: IACHR Warns Against Release of Pinochet Rights Abusers

Former Colonel Sergio Arredondo died on Wednesday at the Military Hospital in Santiago.

Arredondo was carrying out a 15-year sentence for orchestrating the deaths of 14 people at the Punta Peuco prison in Antofagasta that took place in October 1973, shortly after Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990) overthrew the democratically elected government of socialist Salvador Allende. Arredondo’s killings were part of the ‘Caravan of Death’ during which approximately 75 teachers and social activists were tortured and murdered by several military leaders.

The now deceased colonel had been carrying out his sentence since February 2016. Arredondo is the fourth Caravan of Death executioners to have died while serving time in prison over the past several months, preceded by Risiere Altez, Leonidas Bustos, and Rene Cardemil. He died of terminal lung cancer.

Arredondo’s death occurred on the same day that several Chilean legislators brought a formal request to remove several Supreme Court Justices from their posts for freeing five former military members serving time for crimes against humanity (1973 - 1990).

With the support of human rights organization, the legislators presented a constitutional accusation, roughly an indictment, against the judges, Hugo Dolmestch, Carlos Kümsemüller, and Manuel Valderrama for "evident abandonment of constitutional obligations" and “enabling impunity.”

The three magistrates voted to conditionally release former judge Gamaliel Soto, and former soldiers, Jose Quintanilla Fernandez, Hernan Portillo Aranda and Felipe Gonzalez Astorga, along with police officer Manuel Perez Santillan, who had been carrying out sentences for kidnapping, torture, homicide, and crimes against humanity they committed at the Punta Peuco prison during the Pinochet regime.

The three magistrates ruled to release them in July based on good behavior.

In the official document submitted Wednesday, the Congress members argue the justices failed to review international convention on human rights law. The indictment will be voted on Thursday and if approved five legislators will be randomly selected to review the request.


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