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    A specimens of the "four-eyed" toad, Chile, 2020. | Photo: Twitter/ @SoyNuevaPrensa

Published 2 September 2020
Opinion

Specimens of the Pleurodema Marmorata, an endangered species, were found in a wetland.

Chile's National Forestry Corporation (CONAF) Tuesday reported the discovery of six specimens of the so-called "four-eyed toad" in Arica and Parinacota, a region in which there were no records of this amphibian.

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Specimens of this endangered species, whose scientific name is Pleurodema Marmorata, were found in a wetland in the General Lagos sector on August 27.

Until that date, the distribution of this species was only documented in the Putre sector, which is about 70 kilometers away from the place of discovery.

"The most encouraging thing about the event is the verification that the species is reproducing again as the specimens observed included some young toads," the CONAF professional who made the discovery, Sebastian Vidal, explained.

"This could lead to the establishment of specific conservation measures, such as permanent monitoring in the limited conservation area of ​​this amphibian," he added.

Biologists recalled that the driest places are adverse for some amphibians such as the four-eyed toad, a species that requires aquatic and terrestrial habitats to survive.

Before this finding, the last sighting of this toad took place in 2019 in the Salar de Surire. Until then, scientists recorded no observations of the species for a decade.

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