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  • Firefighters attempt to control wildfires from the ground and air, California, U.S., Sept. 2020.

    Firefighters attempt to control wildfires from the ground and air, California, U.S., Sept. 2020. | Photo: Xinhua

Published 17 September 2020
Opinion

Smoke emitted by fires on the U.S. west coast will go across the Atlantic Ocean by this weekend, according to the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service.

California Governor Gavin Newsom Wednesday said that his state has suffered 7,860 wildfires, which have burned more than 3.4 million acres this year.

RELATED:

US: West Coast Fires Kill At Least 12 People, Displace Thousands

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) and the U.S. Forest Service continue to battle the blaze, aided by crews from Montana, Utah, Texas and New Jersey. 

So far, the state has over 17,000 firefighters and 2,200 engines on the fire lines, Governor Newsom said.

The August Complex Fire in Mendocino County, the state's largest-ever, continued growing Wednesday. It has burned through 796,651 acres with 30 percent containment.

The Creek Fire, held at 220,025 acres in Fresno and Madera counties, was 18 percent contained Wednesday morning.

The North Complex fires in Butte, Plumas and Yuba counties remained stable with 273,335 acres burned and containment reaching 36 percent, Cal Fire reported.

Smoke emitted by forest fires on the U.S. west coast will go across the Atlantic Ocean to affect the atmosphere above Europe by this weekend, according to Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS).

"The fact that these wildfires emit so much pollution into the atmosphere, which generates thick smoke we can see from 8,000 kilometers away, reflects how devastating they are in terms of scale and duration," CAMS Senior Scientist Mark Parrington warned, as reported by French outlet NM+.

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