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  • Pro-Brexit and anti-Brexit protesters are pictured outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, March 27, 2019.

    Pro-Brexit and anti-Brexit protesters are pictured outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, March 27, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 27 March 2019

Lawmakers faced eight different possible alternatives to Brexit during a vote Wednesday.

British lawmakers in the House of Commons voted on eight different possible Brexit options on Wednesday, none received the majority support creating an impasse once again in the United Kingdom’s Parliament. 

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Lawmakers had voted on Monday to grab control of the Brexit process for a day in a bid to break the standstill. As desperate measure British Prime Minister Theresa May said Wednesday she would quit if her twice-defeated deal passes at the third attempt, making a last-ditch bid to persuade MPs to back her.

This time lawmakers had to vote on eight different options that included leaving the European Union (EU) without a deal, staying in the bloc's customs union and the single market, a public referendum or canceling Brexit if the prospect of a no-deal departure gets close. 

All Conservative MPs - excluding cabinet ministers- were given a free vote, meaning they were not ordered to vote in a certain way. And, although there were some cross-party votes, it wasn't enough. 

 

Eight Conservatives voted for a referendum to endorse the deal, the proposal which secured the most affirmative votes. Labour whipped its MPs to back the proposal but 10 ministers abstained and MP Melanie Onn quit her job to vote against. Labour's own alternative plan for Brexit was defeated by 307 votes to 237.

The proposal which came closest to commanding majority support was a cross-party plan for the U.K. to join a new customs union with the EU, ensuring a tariff-free trade after Brexit. Yet it followed the other seven proposals that failed to gather enough support.

The U.K. was originally due to leave the EU on March 29 but last week the bloc granted an extension to the split date until April 12.

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