• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
News > Brazil

Brazilian Supreme Court Blocks Bank Accounts of Coup Promoters

  • Trucks parked next to the Army Headquarters, Brasilia, Brazil, Nov. 17, 2022.

    Trucks parked next to the Army Headquarters, Brasilia, Brazil, Nov. 17, 2022. | Photo: Twitter/ @d_Norte

Published 17 November 2022
Opinion

The decision affects far-right rural entrepreneurs who have placed their trucks in front of barracks with the undisguised objective of demanding a military coup.

On Thursday, Brazilian Supreme Court Judge Alexandre de Moraes ordered to block the accounts of far-right activists who disavow President-elect Lula da Silva and call for a coup.

RELATED:

Lula Proposes the Amazon as the Venue for COP30 in 2025

Framed in an investigation of anti-democratic acts, the blocking of bank accounts affects at least 43 agricultural entrepreneurs supporting far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, who was defeated in the second round of the presidential elections held on October 30.

These businessmen own many of the trucks that blocked highways in protest at the victory of the Workers' Party in the elections. In the last week, the far-right activists have placed their vehicles in front of barracks with the undisguised objective of demanding a military coup.

Until now, the generals have ignored the requests of these Bolsonaro supporters who ask to "save Brazil from communism" by preventing Lula from assuming office on Jan. 1, 2023.

Judge De Moraes specified that the far-right rallies demanding a coup d'état represent an abuse of the right of assembly since they seek to promote non-compliance with the electoral decision, the rupture of the rule of law, and the installation of an exception regime.

This happens, for example, on the outskirts of the Army Barracks in Brasilia, where Bolsonaro's supporters have been camping since October 31, with the logistical support provided by the far-right businessmen.

"This scenario requires an absolutely proportional reaction from the State, in the sense of preserving fundamental rights and guarantees," De Moraes pointed out.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.