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  • A supporter of Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker and presidential candidate of the Social Liberal Party (PSL), holds a banner, in Brasilia, Brazil October 7, 2018.

    A supporter of Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker and presidential candidate of the Social Liberal Party (PSL), holds a banner, in Brasilia, Brazil October 7, 2018. | Photo: Reuters

Published 8 October 2018

Moa del Katendê, 63 years old, was assassinated shortly after he publicly announced he would vote for the Workers Party’s leftist candidate Fernando Haddad.

A capoeira and music composer was stabbed to death Sunday in Salvador de la Bahia de Todos los Santos, after he participated in a public forum and debated against radical supporters of ultra-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro.

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The murderer Paulo Sérgio Ferreira de Santana, 36 years old, turned himself to the police after the crime and expressed regrets, reported local authorities.

One of the victims’ brother was also injured during the fight, they added.

The crime was heavily condemned on social media.

Moa del Katendê, born in El Salvador, was an active defensor of afro-Baiana traditions and culture, promoting the “re-africanization” of the youth in Bahia and of Bahia’s carnival.

Brazilians voted Sunday in a polarized presidential race that could result in the election of a far-right former Army captain, Bolsonaro, a long-time congressman who has repeatedly praised the 1964-85 military regime, who had carried out torture, disappearances and extrajudicial killings of activists and opposition. 

Bolsonaro has not hidden his racist views during and before the presidential campaign, saying for instance in a public event in 2017, flanked by a Brazilian and an Israeli flag: “I went to a Quilombo (territory inhabited by Afro-Brazilian descendants of escaped slaves). The lightest Afro-descendant weighed seven arrobas (around 225 pounds). They do nothing. I think they don’t even serve to procreate. Over US$245 million is spent on them every year. ... There will be not one centimeter for an Indigenous reserve or for a Quilombola.”

 


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