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News > Latin America

Bolivia: Morales Seeks New Relationship With Chile After Ruling

  • Morales leaves for The Hague and the verdict on Bolivia's ocean access from El Alto, Bolivia, September 29, 2018.

    Morales leaves for The Hague and the verdict on Bolivia's ocean access from El Alto, Bolivia, September 29, 2018. | Photo: Reuters

Published 29 September 2018
Opinion

The International Court of Justice will rule Monday on Bolivia's demand to negotiate a sea exit with Chile.

Bolivia's President Evo Morales hopes to start a “new era” in his nation's relationship with Chile once the International Court of Justice rules on Bolivia’s demand for sea access on Monday.

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The new age will take “advantage of our potentialities, promoting integration for the wellbeing of our peoples,” Morales said. “It’s necessary to cure injuries from the past.”

After a years-long process, the court will decide whether the Chilean government must negotiate a sea exit for Bolivia. La Paz issued the demand in April 2013.

Morales said he values peaceful solutions for international disputes, based on international law.

“Bolivia will never give up in its cause, that’s why the Bolivian people will gather on October 1 without divisions, without difference around our three-color flag, our wiphala and our sea claim flag,” he said. “Our reunion with the sea is not only possible, but inevitable.”

He also asked the people of Chile to understand the demand shouldn’t be considered an “unfriendly act,” but rather an opportunity.

Bolivia demanded the court declare Chile must negotiate an exit for the Pacific Ocean, based on diplomatic evidence it has previously agreed to do so.

Chile is denying any negotiation based on a 1904 treaty between both countries, giving up 120,000 square kilometers of territory, including 400 shore kilometers, to Chile.

The treaty was a result of the War of the Pacific, in which Bolivia and Peru fought against Chile between 1879 and 1883.

The UN's International Court of Justice is legally binding but it has no means to enforce its rulings over the states.

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