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  • Bolivia's President and presidential candidate Evo Morales of the Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) reacts after the results for the first round of the country's presidential election were announced, in La Paz, Bolivia October 20, 2019.

    Bolivia's President and presidential candidate Evo Morales of the Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) reacts after the results for the first round of the country's presidential election were announced, in La Paz, Bolivia October 20, 2019. | Photo: Reuters

Published 20 October 2019

The left-wing leader claimed victory on Sunday night adding that “most importantly, we again have an absolute majority in the chambers of Deputies and Senators. That is the result of the consciousness of the Bolivian people.”

With 89,34 percent of votes from a preliminary fast count, Bolivian President Evo Morales leads with 45,28 percent of the votes against 38.16 percent from right-wing main opposition candidate Carlos Mesa, final results are still pending.  

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The left-wing leader claimed victory on Sunday night adding that “most importantly, we again have an absolute majority in the chambers of Deputies and Senators. That is the result of the consciousness of the Bolivian people.”

While Mesa publicly said they will face the president in a runoff vote. However, official results are not yet in, meaning a first-round victory is still possible for Morales who counts on the rural vote to obtain the 10-point lead to win outright, as he has reached the 40 percent needed. 

Polls opened at 8:00 am local time and closed eight hours later at 4:00 p.m. local time. The next president will govern from 2020-2025, as well as the 36 senators and 130 lawmakers that were elected on Sunday. 

Morales, whose campaign slogan is "Secure Future," has fanned fears that Mesa would seek support from the International Monetary Fund, and warned about the recent unrest in Ecuador and Argentina over unpopular loan deals with the IMF.

If the head of state and his party Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) doesn’t secure the first-round win, he will have to face Mesa in a second-round on Dec. 15.

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