• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • More than 6,000 musicians clad in red, yellow and green shirts in honor of the Bolivian flag wowed the crowds at the XVII Oruro Band Festival.

    More than 6,000 musicians clad in red, yellow and green shirts in honor of the Bolivian flag wowed the crowds at the XVII Oruro Band Festival. | Photo: EFE

Published 3 February 2018
Opinion

In 2001, Unesco declared the Oruro Carnival an Oral Masterpiece and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

Hundreds of people flooded the streets of Bolivian capital La Paz on Saturday to revel in a preview of the celebrations that will take place during next week's Oruro Carnival festival.

RELATED: 

Morales Calls to Celebrate Indigenous Culture at Pinkillada Festival

More than 6,000 musicians clad in red, yellow and green shirts in honor of the Bolivian flag wowed the crowds at the XVII Oruro Band Festival, one of the main events ahead of the forthcoming carnival.

The two-hour extravaganza included Bolivian dances such as the tinku, salay, the morenada and the caporales. In a performance of The Diablada, dancers brought to life the eternal struggle between good and evil, represented by a battle between the archangel San Miguel and Lucifer.

Musicians dressed in the colors of the Bolivian flag. | Photo: EFE

The show concluded with interpretations of "Viva mi Patria Bolivia," considered Bolivia's second national anthem; a recital by the San José soccer club; and the song "Dear Sea, Sea Dreamed," which was dedicated to Bolivia's 100-year-old claim to the seas.

The event was attended by Vice-President Alvaro Garcia Linera and Minister of Culture and Tourism Vilma Alanoca.

Next week, the 6,000 musicians and tens of thousands of dancers will take centerstage in the Oruro Carnival, declared by Unesco in 2001 an Oral Masterpiece and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.