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  • The blast killed at least five people and injured eight police officers, according to Turkish media.

    The blast killed at least five people and injured eight police officers, according to Turkish media. | Photo: Twitter/Kurdistan Report

Published 14 January 2016

Turkish officials immediately blamed the attack on the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or the PKK.

At least five people, including two children, were killed in a massive blast at the police headquarters in Diyarbakir, Turkey’s largest Kurdish city.

A further 39 were injured, including eight police officers, after a car bomb went off near the entrance of the headquarters, damaging nearby residential buildings. A father and his two children were among the victims, reported Al Jazeera Turk. Other media only reported the death of a five-month-old baby.

Gunfire after the blast lasted about 40 minutes.

No group has yet claimed responsibility, though Turkish officials immediately blamed the attack on PKK militants.

A newly-formed Kurdish self-defense force modeled off the Syrian Kurdish YPG, the Civil Protection Units (YPS), also attacked Turkish police forces on Tuesday night in the southeast Hakkari province, according to the Kurdish Hawar News Agency. YPS launched the attack while an armored vehicle from the Turkish army drove to a security checkpoint in the town, but no injuries were reported.

The same day, Kurdish media reported that four were killed by police special forces in the Kurdish city of Kiziltepe, and one civilian was reportedly killed by Turkish security forces in Cizre.

Shortly before the shooting, thousands joined a funeral procession of 12 civilians killed in Cizre, Silopi and Şırnak, which have been under self-rule to resist attacks from Turkish forces. Two more Kurdish civilians were killed in Cizre on Wednesday, reported ANF.

Since the cease-fire between Turkey and the PKK was broken in July, 17 Kurdish provinces have been under curfew, leading almost 200,000 residents to leave their homes, reported Today’s Zaman. Kurdish lawyers had asked the European Court of Human Rights to issue a temporary injunction against the curfews, but the court rejected that request Wednesday.

Earlier this week, hundreds of women marched to protest the 58 curfews and resulting operations declared since August. At least 69 civilians have been killed in the southeast in less than a month, according to the Human Rights Foundation of Turkey, and at least 162 have died since mid-August.

In protest of the mounting violence, 23 Turkish soldiers deployed in the Sirnak province recently resigned, reported the Hawar News Agency on Wednesday. Turkish male citizens are subjected to mandatory military service, but many enroll in school, pay a fee or leave the country to avoid conscription.


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Comments
Erdogan takes all responsibility for the attacks in Turkey since for many years he created a basis for ISIS and terrorists to use Turkey on mutually advantageous terms for him and them.
Crazy militarists make no contribution to global security.
Erdogan should blame himself for all Turkey's troubles because building an Islamists state was a huge mistake just like accepting Turkey to NATO. Maybe it's time to revise NATO's decision and kick Turkey and Erdogan from NATO?
Erdogan takes all responsibility for the attacks in Turkey since for many years he created a basis for ISIS and terrorists to use Turkey on mutually advantageous terms for him and them.
Crazy militarists make no contribution to global security.
Erdogan should blame himself for all Turkey's troubles because building an Islamists state was a huge mistake just like accepting Turkey to NATO. Maybe it's time to revise NATO's decision and kick Turkey and Erdogan from NATO?