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  •   Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel and his Argentinian counterpart Alberto Fernandez stressed the need to strengthen bilateral ties.

    Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel and his Argentinian counterpart Alberto Fernandez stressed the need to strengthen bilateral ties. | Photo: Cuba Minister of Foreign Affairs/ @BrunoRguezP

Published 11 December 2019
Opinion

This was the first official meeting Fernandez held as president of the South American nation, who was sworn into office on Dec. 10.

Argentinian President Alberto Fernandez and his Cuban counterpart Miguel Diaz-Canel met Wednesday in Buenos Aires to speak about bilateral relations, agreeing to continue and expand the exchange of food and medicine between both nations.

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"The heads of state stressed the importance of increasing the exchange of medicine and food, with special emphasis on generic drugs for senior adults in our country," Argentina’s presidency said in a statement.

This was the first official meeting Fernandez held as president of the South American nation, who was sworn into office on Dec. 10.  

The president emphasized that his new government will promote "mutual cooperation" to strengthen the cultural, scientific, and sporting exchange between Argentina and Cuba. "We have a brotherhood commitment to Cuba," Fernandez acknowledged. 

In a fraternal encounter between President Diaz-Canel and Argentinian Vice President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner,  they highlighted the desire to deepen the historical, cultural, friendship and cooperation ties between the two nations.
 

A sentiment echoed by Diaz-Canel, who at a solidarity event held at the University of Buenos Aires with over 800 attendees on Tuesday said that “there's no force in this world that can pull Cuba and Argentina apart.”

As Fernandez was sworn in, the progressive president vowed to reinstate a “new social contract” to "summon the unity of all of Argentina" for the welfare of the entire population, especially those who have been hit hardest by the worst economic crisis in the country's history.

The head of state, who supersedes the right-wing politician Mauricio Macri, will face a complicated economic scenario marked by high public debt, a fragile national currency, the constant rise in prices and unemployment, as well as two-figure poverty figures across the nation. 

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