• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • An Adelie penguin stands atop a block of melting ice near the French station at Dumont d’Urville in East Antarctica.

    An Adelie penguin stands atop a block of melting ice near the French station at Dumont d’Urville in East Antarctica. | Photo: Reuters

Published 29 July 2016

The first all-women expedition will spend three weeks on the continent to both conduct research and elevate the status of women in the sciences.

The first all-women expedition to Antarctica will bring expertise from across the sciences to develop research on how climate change will affect the planet’s women.

RELATED:
Nobel Laureate Resigns After Demeaning Female Scientists

Homeward Bound launched its first year-long at-sea training for 78 scientists “to enhance the influence and impact of women in science to ensure the sustainability of our beautiful planet.”

The program has a 10-year mandate to create a network of 1,000 women “to contribute to the recognition of our planet as home,” according to its website.

The Antarctica trip, the culmination of the program, will last three weeks and was chosen for being the most vulnerable to global warming.

The team includes astronomers, engineers, physicists, science communicators, doctors and social scientists — all fields in which women are visibly underrepresented. Some big-name scientists will participate, including primatologist Jane Goodall and environmental activist Franny Armstrong.

"I think the scope of the program isn't intended to be only for women," said Jess Melbourne-Thomas, head of the Australian Antarctic Division, to the Sydney Morning Herald.

"The participants in this voyage will be, but partly that's to address the issue of the leaky pipeline in science, in influential positions you see fewer and fewer women."


Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.