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  • Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker and presidential candidate of the Social Liberal Party (PSL),waves at a polling station in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil October 28, 201

    Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker and presidential candidate of the Social Liberal Party (PSL),waves at a polling station in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil October 28, 201 | Photo: Reuters

Published 28 October 2018

Brazil's right-wing presidential candidate, Jair Bolsonaro threatened to take Brazil out of the UN, what he calls meeting place for communists.

As Brazilians are at the polls on Sunday deciding between leftist Workers’ Party Fernando Haddad and the far-right Jair Bolsonaro in a run-off presidential competition, comments from Bolsonaro are resurfacing where the Social Liberal Party (PSL) candidate said that if elected he would pull out Brazil from the United Nations because it’s full of “communists.”

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Outrageous Quotes That Prove Jair Bolsonaro is a Threat to Brazil's Democracy

"If I am president, I will leave the UN. That institution is of no use," announced the former army captain at a military ceremony held in Rio de Janeiro on July 22.

Bolsonaro, who has been nationally and internationally criticized for his sexist, racist, authoritarian, and neoliberal comments said during the event three months ago: "I will leave (the U.N.) it's no good, it's a meeting place for communists and people who have no commitment to South America."

The comments are part of a long series of controversial statements made by far-right Bolsonaro over the past several years. In 2011, he told Playboy magazine that he "would be incapable of loving a homosexual son" and in a 2016 documentary Bolsonaro claimed that homosexuality had “increased” over the decades due to “liberal habits, drugs and because women began to work."

In 2017 at a speech in Rio de Janeiro he said that "Afro-descendants do nothing. I do not think they even serve as reproducers." The candidate also promotes anti-feminist policies and gender inequality.

The Brazilian candidate has gained wide acceptance and voter support in South America’s largest economy capitalizing on “social frustrations that have … permeated society in Brazil, and in Latin America in general," Pablo Meriguet Calle, historian, and expert in anti-fascist movement told teleSUR in a prior interview.

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